10 resources for Alzheimer’s disease behavior problems

People with Alzheimer’s disease may start acting like they never would have before, but that’s the disease acting out. Underneath is the same person that you knew and came to love and that you now provide care for. As such, the following fact sheets, articles, and assorted resources can help you adapt to those changes in behavior while at the same time offering tender love and care.

Behavior

1.       Bathing Without a Battle: Person-Directed Care of Individuals with Dementia (2008, 208 p.)

Aimed at paid and informal caregivers with the goal of switching from distressing and discomforting bathing practices to an individualized approach. Proven strategies in institutional and home environments.

 

·         Springer Publishing Co.

·         Phone: 1-877-687-7476.

·         Email: [email protected].

·         Paperback $60.

 

 

2.       Behavioral and Psychiatric Alzheimer’s Symptoms (2011, 4 p.)

Helps identify behavioral symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, understand what causes them, and learn about drugs and non-pharmacological treatments.

 

·         Alzheimer’s Association.

·         Phone: 1-800-272-3900.

·         Email: [email protected]

3.       Behaviors: How to Respond When Dementia Causes Unpredictable Behaviors (2012, 16 p.)

Describes aggression, anxiety, agitation, confusion, repetition, suspicion, and other behaviors common in dementia patients and how to cope with them. Helps recognize causes and triggers and how to address them.

 

·         Alzheimer’s Association.

·         Phone: 1-800-272-3900.

·         Email: [email protected]

4.       Coping with Agitation and Aggression (2012, 2 p.)

Includes definitions of agitation and aggression, a list of potential causes, and coping suggestions.

 

·         National Institute on Aging Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center.

·         Phone: 1-800-438-4380.

·         Email: [email protected]

5.       Family Guide to Alzheimer’s Disease: Volume 2—Behavior Issues (2004, 67 min.)

The second volume of a series for families dealing with Alzheimer, this hour-plus long video focuses on the causes of and approaches to agitation, aggression, hallucinations, wandering, sleeplessness, sundowning, incontinence, socially inappropriate behaviors, and other problems.

 

·         LifeView Resources.

·         Phone: 1-800-395-5433.

·         Email: [email protected].

·         $24.95.

6.       Hallucinations, Delusions, and Paranoia (PDF, 616K) (2012, 2 p.)

A concise description of these behaviors as well as advice for dealing with them. Contains little known facts such as that the patient with Alzheimer’s disease may be justified in being paranoid, for instance if they have been the victim of abuse.

 

·         National Institute on Aging Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center.

·         Phone: 1-800-438-4380.

·         Email: [email protected]

7.       Managing Personality and Behavior Changes (PDF, 977K) (2012, 2 p.)

This online tip sheet describes common personality changes and their possible causes, such as the patient’s health or environment. Includes advice on how to cope with these changes.

 

·         National Institute on Aging Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center.

·         Phone: 1-800-438-4380.

·         Email: [email protected]

8.       Rummaging and Hiding Things (PDF, 608K) (2012, 2 p.)

Provides steps to help people with Alzheimer’s disease with a tendency to search through cabinets and drawers or hide things to do so safely.

 

·         National Institute on Aging Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center.

·         Phone: 1-800-438-4380.

·         Email: [email protected]

9.       Safe Return: Alzheimer’s Disease Guide for Law Enforcement (PDF, 231K) (2006, 5 p.)

Designed to help law officers understand what Alzheimer is and how it affects people – including the top 10 warning signs. Discusses a person wandering and getting lost, auto accidents, false reports, indecent exposure, shoplifting, and other possible scenarios, and what to do if a person with dementia is reported missing.

 

·         Alzheimer’s Association.

·         Phone: 1-800- 272-3900.

·         Email: [email protected]

10.   Sundowning (PDF, 216K) (2013, 2 p.)

Defines sundowning as restlessness, agitation, irritability, or confusion that can occur or become worse at dusk. Caregivers are taught how to detect signs of sundowning and how to respond to them. Also includes prevention tips.

 

 

·          National Institute on Aging Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center.

·         Phone: 1-800-438-4380.

·         Email: [email protected]