How important is Obamacare to voters?

obamacare to voters

The Affordable Care Act is extremely important to 27% of registered voters, very important to 35%, somewhat important to 22%, and not too important to 12%. Moreover, only 8% consider it the single most important issue ahead of the United States midterm elections for the U.S. House and Senate on November 4th, according to the most recent Kaiser Health Tracking Poll. This is actually good news for proponents of the healthcare law, because it means that 53% of voters are tired of hearing candidates of Congress discuss Obamacare and would rather they focused on other topics such as the economy, education, immigration, the situation, in Iraq and Syria, and the overall state of the government, while 44% think it’s important to continue the debate.

How important will each of the following be among registered voters to vote for Congress

 

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

Not too much

Economy and jobs

38%

46%

12%

2%

Education

36%

42%

15%

5%

Dissatisfaction w/government

33%

36%

18%

9%

Situation in Iraq and Syria

31%

40%

18%

6%

Federal budget deficit

28%

36%

22%

10%

2010 healthcare law

27%

35%

22%

12%

Immigration

25%

33%

27%

13%

Taxes

24%

41%

26%

7%

Climate change

15%

22%

28%

32%

 

More importantly, in spite of the negative or indifferent reception Americans have given the Affordable Care Act, the majority would prefer to see it improved instead of repealed or replaced with something else. Only 16% of people say the law has directly helped them and their families, while 26% report that it has hurt them or their families, and 56% claim it has had no direct impact whatsoever. Nonetheless, 64% would rather see their representative in Congress work to improve the law, while 33% would prefer to see their representative work to repeal and replace it with something else.

One thing seems sure, and it’s that consumers will continue to hear about the Affordable Care Act – both for and against, but mostly against – in the two weeks that remain before the midterms. Sixty-two percent of registered voters saw ads or commercials supporting, opposing or trying to influence their vote for a political candidate because of their position on the healthcare law in the previous 30 days. Additionally, 25% saw more ads opposed while only 6% saw more ads in favor, although 27% said they saw about equal number of both. Even in states with a non-competitive or no Senate race, 59% of respondents saw a similar proportion of ads. 

Related Read:

How many Americans are happy with the healthcare system?